Thursday, June 11, 2009

Q Tips

NPR related comments welcomed.

7 comments:

Steve Byan said...

Gak! I receive an email entitled "The Exchange" from NPR Listens:

Hello, Steve!
You’re reading The Exchange, our quarterly newsletter for NPR Listens panelists.

How do panelists rate different news sources’ economic news coverage?

Last month, we surveyed panelists to find out what they think of different news sources’ economic coverage and what changes they’d like to see. Listeners rated The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and NPR as best for economic news reporting. Most said that the amount of economic news on NPR matches their needs, but the tone doesn’t: Listeners said that they are tired of hearing so many depressing stories and want to hear more uplifting and advice-oriented stories. Many also recommended adding more content that emulates the tone of reports on Planet Money or This American Life.

(Emphasis mine.) Just more evidence that NPR is irredeemably FUBAR'd; they are in their death-spiral.

biggerbox said...

Did NPR decide all of its listeners are children?

Today's Morning Edition sounds like a youth science show, illustrating the concept of 'cap and trade' with a hypothetical cap on saying the word "dude." No, I'm not kidding. First, the essential concept behind cap and trade is not that difficult, so why bother with an analogy at all? Second, dude? Dude. That's just stupid, dude.

(NPR: there's a difference between being fresh and relevant, and being morons.)

It was also interesting that, in their entire discussion of the debate about a public option in the health care reform package, there was no mention of insurance industry lobbying. I think the old Schoolhouse Rock "I'm Just A Bill" had a more sophisticated take on the legislative process!

I feel like I tuned into Kids Radio.

Anonymous said...

Listeners said that they are tired of hearing so many depressing stories and want to hear more uplifting and advice-oriented stories. "

That does not surprise me.This is exactly what one would expect from a clientele who are primarily interested in reinforcing their own identity rather than hearing the truth.

Ironically, such irrational exuberance" (as greenspan called it) is precisely what created the giant housing bubble that led to the economic meltdown when it burst.

Planet Money appeals to NPR listeners because it tells them what they want to hear: that the fundamentals of the economy are sound and that it is only a matter of low consumer confidence.

So lets all prop up the old system (by giving trillions to the banks) and go out to the mall and continue to max out our credit cards!

What vacuous nonsense.

The only thing that suprises me in this case is that NPR would admit that this is what they are about: feeding people the BS that they want to hear.

big!pink!earless!bunny! said...

RE: Steve's post

Yah. Like, why not. Phhhbbbbt.

Woody (Tokin Librul/Rogue Scholar/ Helluvafella!) said...

Listeners said that they are tired of hearing so many depressing stories and want to hear more uplifting and advice-oriented stories.


Jimmy Swaggart with stock tips, or Jim Cramer with prayers and hymns...

b?p?f?b? said...

Now! Preaching! Religion!

ya got it!

Anonymous said...

Late at night listening to NPR heard the following newsblurb which stated that a 72 year old woman who was tazed by police was basically asking for it. You be the judge . . .



http://www.dailystab.com/72-year-old-woman-gets-tasered/



TEXAS - - - YEE HAH!!!!!