Monday, November 17, 2008

Q Tips

NPR related comments welcomed.

13 comments:

George said...

Kokie was in full blown concern troll mode this morning, previewing the republican talking points regarding Obama's staff and cabinet choices. Her utter disdain for the Clinton's was evident, and she was quite at ease criticizing Obama's judgment. I'm sure this is only the beginning.

Mary Jane said...

I used to get upset with Cokie's commentaries, until I decided to look at them as satire, and now actually look forward to them for my Monday morning laugh.

Porter Melmoth said...

You might apply that principle to most of NPR News: laughable. Except I'm not smiling.

big!pink!fuzzy!bunny! said...

In my view their coverage is worthy of this adjective:

Ignorable.

Porter Melmoth said...

It's a pity that Pasolini isn't around to make an explosive film about the 'real' NPR. Hell, it would probably get him bumped off... (I'm trying to keep alive the 'Salo' connection, b!p!)

Ollie Stone's too mellow now to do it. Maybe we should get Michael Moore on the phone...

b!p!f!b! said...

Indeedy so, Port - the sheer pluck of PPP seems to be lost on our present-day auteurs/provocateurs. The Yes Men perhaps? Would throwing in some CGI talking-animal crap seal the deal?

Ah, but a wicked fantasy to entertain - visualize the Studio One stable (what the heck, throw in a couple guest thinktankers, shills, so on) all stripped down and on the leash - "Manga!! MAAAANGA!!!!"

(and while Salò sure does rock, I was utterly charmed by his "Uccellacci e uccellini")

Jimmy James Jr. said...

Folkenfuck was doing his level best here today.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=97036391

Jimmy James Jr. said...

Cokie's appearance on NPR today leaves off from her appearance on This Week on Sunday.

Anonymous said...

In my opinion, NPR suffers from the same problem as Congress:

Dead wood. No one ever seems to be fired for poor performance or even for gross negligence.

If Anne Garrels was not fired for that interview of the tortured Iraqis, no one will ever be.

When there are no consequences for poor performance, the quality goes right down the toilet.

That is precisely what has happened at NPR over the past decade and a half.


No to mention the fact that NPR seems to be the final resting place for old news people who have "retired" from their regular careers.

Porter Melmoth said...

As Mike Wallace's character in 'The Insider' said:

"I don't plan to spend the end of my days wandering in the wilderness of National Public Radio."

And he didn't.

(A reference, I think, to his former colleague, the esteemed Dan Schorr, who has become the Grand Old Fool of NPR.)

Anonymous said...

my impression listening to NPR is an "anti-Bailout" bias regarding GM's current troubles. Anyone else?

Steve Byan said...

Anon asks "my impression listening to NPR is an "anti-Bailout" bias regarding GM's current troubles. Anyone else?"

Oh definitely. NPR's been in the Milton Friedman school of laissez-faire capitalism for quite some time. I think everyone's conveniently forgotten the era of robber-barons.

Anonymous said...

NPR is for anything that Pat ...I mean henry..Paulson is for.

Last month, they were trying their damnedest to get Paulson's bailout plan passed (following Bush's "Great Depression" fear mongering cue) and now, when Paulson says he opposes a bailout of GM, NPR follows suit.